Month: March 2010

  • Diamond Head

    Diamond Head, the iconic Hawaiian volcano, is probably one of the most photographed mountains in the world and, as a good tourist on O’ahu, I tried my best to do my part. From sea to summit, Diamond Head rises 762 feet; fortunately, the hiking trail inside the crater already spots you two-hundred feet of elevation […]

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  • BHF – Aging Gracefully

    Ah… this has to be one of my favorite shots from our last Hawaiian adventure. My wife and I waxed poetic about this older couple walking Waikiki beach hand-in-hand in front of us. We playfully envisioned them as though we were staring thirty-or-so years into our future: still in Hawaii, still madly in love, flaunting […]

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  • Holga Hike Today

    Today’s the day!!! Both Spring & the Holga Hike are here. Shake off those Winter blues by getting outdoors with your Holga and capturing the pleasant pastels of Spring (or lovely black & whites, if you’re so inclined…). Just remember to submit your image by April 5th. I was already out & about with my […]

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  • Sometimes the magic gives you toads

    Somewhere along the way, my vintage Diana F developed a dastardly light leak in the upper left-hand side of the frame (lower-right image). As opposed to a beneficial or relatively benign light leak, I’d say this one ruined several rolls of film from Hawaii, except ‘ruined’ is such an ugly word. How about I just […]

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  • My Favorite Photographer

    So apparently I’m not above a little bit of open pandering for free film. UPDATE 03.16.10: I didn’t win the free film. Oh well. Who is my favorite photographer? I’m not necessarily sure I’ve ever truly pondered that question before. Of course, my mind goes to such luminaries as Ansel Adams, Alfred Stieglitz, Andreas Feininger […]

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  • BHF – Waikiki Sunset

    Another image from my trip to O’ahu this past December. My wife & I were hurrying along, trying to get from the hotel to the House Without a Key for cocktails, after spending a little bit too long at the beach that day. We had just started our mile-long stroll when I startled my wife […]

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  • First Annual Holga Hike

    Ah… the signs of Spring’s imminent arrival keep popping up around me: Temperatures are rising and the snow is beginning to melt, robins are roosting and geese are returning from their southernly sojourn, and probably most tell-tale, I finally wore my Chucks outside for the first time this year; although on March 20th, the first […]

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  • Smashing Magazine

    Smashing Magazine has an article on ‘Toy Cameras’ featuring a piece of my Holga work. The article is a general survey of toy cameras for the uninitiated (generally sticking to the Lomography retail line-up) and includes several digital means to reproduce the toy camera and Polaroid aesthetics. While the semanticist in me disagrees with the […]

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  • How to flip a Brownie Hawkeye Flash lens

    [caption id="attachment_165" align="alignleft" width="249" caption="Kodak Brownie Hawkeye Flash"]Brownie Hawkeye Flash[/caption]

    I've noticed a lot of search traffic hitting my site specifically looking for information on how to flip the lens of a Kodak Brownie Hawkeye Flash (BHF). While there are probably multitudes of other resources on the interwebs, I figure I'll just throw my two-cents out there.

    For those who don't know, the BHF is a black bakelite beauty with a top-down viewfinder, single element meniscus lens, shutter speed somewhere around 1/30 to 1/60 & a bulb setting, while it lacks a tripod mount, it has a nifty handle. In it's heyday, the BHF was a very popular camera. Your grandparents most likely had one. Nowadays, you can find them cheaply at thrift stores, flea markets, garage sales, and eBay, or for a higher premium decorating shelves in antique stores & hipster boutiques. I, personally, got mine for free on Craigslist thanks to a kind-hearted Samaritan who was donating several cameras to anyone who could justify receiving one. I simply wrote “I'll use it.” It arrived in the mail a couple days later and I've been enthralled with it ever since. Anywho, an unmodified BHF takes a relatively normal photograph, but something magical happens when you flip the lens. It's like the soft focus of a vintage Diana multiplied to the Nth degree. The lens' focal point shifts from infinity to about 3 feet in the center, while the edges just melt away into blurry goodness. The effect can be quite surreal. Flipping the lens of a BHF is actually a simple procedure with a very low-risk of permanently #@$%-ing anything up and is easily reversible. That said, I assume no responsibility with these directions if you somehow manage to accidentally bork your favorite family heirloom. Ready? Let's get flipping.

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  • Pali Pano

    I’m starting to process some of the multitudes of images I captured on O’ahu this past December. The above photograph was taken at a tourist pull-off on the Pali Highway, a scenic route that takes you over (and through) the mountains from Honolulu to Kailua on the windward coast. By its nature, it’s a shot […]

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